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If a Democratic wave breaks over state legislatures, its effects will be lasting: Redistricting, police reform and election law all hang on the November 3rd polls

If a Democratic wave breaks over state legislatures, its effects will be lasting: Redistricting, police reform and election law all hang on the November 3rd polls

If a Democratic wave breaks over state legislatures, its effects will be lasting: Redistricting, police reform and election law all hang on the November 3rd polls



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  1. We need a blue wave sweeping across the country, from local, state, to federal positions. Some actual progress will finally be able to accomplished.

    The GOP wants to keep us stuck in the dark ages and kill us off by climate and pandemic inaction. They want to line the coffers of their corporate overlords while everyone else suffers and dies. Those bums need to be voted out and thoroughly rebuked.

  2. So many people don’t grasp that this election isn’t just about ousting Trump.

    Its so important because of everything that falls on it, from president to redistricting to social reforms. Its so much bigger than just removing the orange dickwad.

  3. Paywall:

    Most Americans do not know who their state representatives are. Only 12% could correctly name them in a Co-operative Congressional Election Study from Harvard in 2018. But on a recent Saturday when Janet Diaz, who is running for Pennsylvania’s state Senate, knocked on doors belonging to Democratic-leaning households with (her data suggested) patchy voting records, the looks were not as blank as normal. Some even recognised her.

    If elected, Ms Diaz would be the first Democrat to win the district since the 1870s. The 13th state Senate district, which stretches from Lancaster and its suburbs to rolling farmland, is probably the most competitive race in a competitive state (our modelling suggests Pennsylvania is the state most likely to decide who wins the White House). Pennsylvania is also one of the states the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) is trying to flip.

    Democrats need nine seats to win control of Pennsylvania state’s House of Representatives and have a shot at winning the Senate, too. The DLCC is spending $50m (a record) in 13 states including Arizona, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Texas. Other left-leaning groups, such as the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, headed by Eric Holder, Barack Obama’s attorney-general, are spending on state races too.

    The Democrats have been playing catch-up since 2010, when they were outspent and oursmarted by Republicans and lost control of 21 chambers. During Mr Obama’s two terms, Democrats lost around 1,000 of the 4,000-odd state seats they held in 2009 (there are 7,383 in all). This cost them not only control of the policy agenda but also, in many states, control of the power to draw congressional-district boundaries.

    A decade later, Democrats control 39 out of 98 chambers (not counting Nebraska’s unicameral, non-partisan legislature) and has regained 450 of those seats. On the watch of Jessica Post, head of the DLCC, they have flipped ten state legislative chambers and made inroads in North Carolina and Texas. They are unlikely to match the Republicans’ success in 2010, but only because the low-hanging fruit has already been picked. At stake, once again, is control over redistricting, after the 2020 census. David Abrams of the Republican State Leadership Committee says this means “there’s a decade of power hanging in the balance” on November 3rd.

    In addition to Pennsylvania, other state legislatures to watch include Arizona, which has not had a Democratic chamber in more than 40 years and where the party needs only two seats to flip the House and three to take the Senate. The Texas House needs nine seats to flip. Mark Jones of Rice University judges that Donald Trump’s name at the top of the ticket “has put the Texas House in play”.

    It is not just the scale of spending which is unusual (elections to state offices being the poor relation of those for Congress). Run for Something, a political-action committee, has recruited 62,000 young Democrats to stand for office, with 500 on the ballot next week. Rita Bosworth, a founder of the Sister District Project, which pairs volunteers with swing districts, points to Colorado as an example of the difference candidate recruitment can make. Her group helped to secure a Democratic clean-sweep there in 2018. In June this year Colorado’s lawmakers passed sweeping police reforms. The opportunity for more of that is on the ballot, too.

  4. Democrats actually need to make good on these promises though. No more, “Well we’re going to work closely with Republicans to make sure we come out with something we can all agree on”. I’d love for bipartisan legislation, but if there’s anything the last 12 years have taught me is that the GOP cares only about sustaining power, and admitting they fucked up and giving the appearance that the Democrats can fix things is not in their playbook. They will do everything in their power to make sure the Government doesn’t function and people aren’t helped so they can turn around and say “See, Biden didn’t fix anything! You need to vote Republican!”.

    They did it with Obama, and they’ll absolutely do it with a Biden Administration if given the chance.

  5. This will all be rendered moot by the courts unless we pack the courts a bit. Here’s hoping the Dems have the guts to do it!

  6. > Democrats have been playing catch-up since 2010, when they were outspent and oursmarted by Republicans and lost control of 21 chambers. During Mr Obama’s two terms, Democrats lost around 1,000 of the 4,000-odd state seats they held in 2009 (there are 7,383 in all). This cost them not only control of the policy agenda but also, in many states, control of the power to draw congressional-district boundaries.

    > A decade later, Democrats control 39 out of 98 chambers (not counting Nebraska’s unicameral, non-partisan legislature) and has regained 450 of those seats

    Everybody knows how Republicans have ratfucked all 3 branches of the federal govm’t, but we don’t talk enough about the damage they’ve done at the state level, and how that has implications for the federal level too via things like gerrymandering and voter suppression.

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