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Transplant Season 1 Episode 10 Review: Collapse

Bash Finds His Mom - Transplant Season 1 Episode 10



Bash really needs to deal with his PTSD. That was the biggest takeaway from Transplant Season 1 Episode 10.


Mags’ storyline was disappointing, June’s was surprising, and Claire’s was illuminating. Yet the biggest, most important part came back to our leading man.


Bash has suffered countless traumas in Syria, not least of which was finding the body of his dead mother in a hospital explosion.

Dr. Bishop: You said you did those procedures in the war. It’s understandable if this one got to you, given the events of the day.
Bash: It didn’t. I hesitated. That’s all.
Dr. Bishop: I think we both know it was more than that.


York Memorial’s psychologist has offered to help Bash in the past, and Bash should really take him up on that.


He’s freezing up in the operating room, having flashbacks. That could cost a patient his or her life! It isn’t so safe for Bash, either.


PTSD is a real medical problem, and as a doctor, Bash should take it seriously. It’s not uncommon for doctors to experience it, particularly those who work in emergency medicine. On top of that, Bash is a war vet.


Bash needs support and proper treatment for his PTSD. He can’t administer it himself. He needs help. There’s a reason they say doctors make the worst patients.


Bash seems scared of admitting he has a problem. He loves being a doctor, and he doesn’t want to be benched like Mags.

Dr. Bishop: Mags!
Mags: WhaT?
Dr. Bishop: Where do you spend every waking moment of your days?
Mags: In this hospital.
Dr. Bishop: Exactly. And when you’re not here, what’re you doing?
Mags: Reading.
Dr. Bishop: Reading what?
Mags: Medical textbooks. I’ve read three studies on this procedure, and I’ve watched every video avaliable online. You’re the one always telling me not to overthink, but I’m ready fo this because of all the work I’ve done.
Dr. Bishop: I agree.
Mags: You do.
Dr. Bishop; If I were stuck in an elevator with a hematoma, no imaging, and no tools, I’d be lucky to have you there to handle it.


Speaking of Mags, I was really underwhelmed with how her arc resolved. Seeing her treat a patient in an elevator was exciting. Seeing her work without imaging was reminiscent of Bash and her early clashes with him.


However, hearing Dr. Bishop tell her she belonged in emergency medicine after her improvised surgery was confusing. She did good, no doubt about it. Sure, it was a little out of her comfort zone, but it wasn’t surprising.


Dr. Bishop talked Mags through it by reminding her that he knew she was capable. Afterward, he acted like he was just learning of her capability for the first time.


With all the emphasis they put on Mags taking a step back because she was over-working herself on Transplant Season 1 Episode 9, the resolution of that storyline felt very rushed.

Mags: DrBishop! Dr. Bishop, I just … I want you to know you were wrong about me when you suggested that internal was a better fit. Because emergency is where I belong-
Dr. Bishop: I know.
Mags: No, but what I’m s-
Dr. Bishop: You showed me that today. Welcome home, Dr. Leblanc.


As a TV doctor, my diagnosis was for a Mags-centric episode to explore her issues. Instead, it was a side plot. Transplant seems to give relatively equal screentime to all the doctors.


We care about each of them, but there’s an argument to be made for character-centric episodes. We’ve gotten that a little with Theo, and we’ve gotten it a little with Dr. Bishop. Mostly, though, the show is all about Bash.


June was, once again, feeling underappreciated. That’s been her thing since day one.


Her attending seems to underestimate and underappreciate her constantly. It could be because of her skin color, though it is more likely because of her gender.


In the past, we’ve taken June’s side on these issues. It seemed like Dr. Singh would listen to male doctors over her.

Dr. Singh: I was minutes away. You should have waited.
June: Would you be saying the same thing if I was Dr. Miller.
Dr. Singh: You think I’m giving you a hard time because you’re a woman. When I started here 25 years ago, I was the only brown face in the department.
June: Well, I guess you found a way to pay that prejudice forward.
Dr. Singh: If that’s what you wanna believe, Dr. Curtis, fine. But the truth is, you shouldn’t have performed that procedure alone, for the same reason I didn’t want Dr. Miller to go ahead and divide that cystic artery this morning, which I explained to him after you left. Because you’re not ready.
June: A patient’s gonna live a normal life because of what I did in there.
Dr. Singh: Your execution was sloppy. You cut wider than necessary, and you used twice the mesh that you needed. He’ll have a harder recovery because of it. This isn’t about your gender, or your sense of entitlement, or the massive chip on your shoulder! It’s about the patients. Consider that next time, before you cut.


He wouldn’t give her credit when she figured something out. He wouldn’t listen to her about a woman that he thought was crying wolf.


This time, it seems like there is more to it. He’s dealt with prejudice himself. He pointed out exactly what she did wrong, which had nothing to do with the fact that she was a woman.


She thought he cut Dr. Miller slack, but he called Dr. Miller out privately.


Just because Dr. Singh has dealt with prejudice doesn’t mean he can’t be prejudiced.


Even if he doesn’t mean to show his prejudice, unconscious bias is incredibly common. Our experiences color how we approach situations, and we have to actively try to overrule those biases.

Bash: Are you okay?
Mags: Yeah. What? Am I okay? Are you? What were you thinking? You could’ve been killed. You can’t just-
Bash: Show up and volunteer as a doctor?


That being said, some of what June is feeling may be in her head. She does have a major chip on her shoulder, probably because of her unique experiences.


She may expect prejudice to the point where she sees it when it isn’t there. She assumes she’ll be dismissed as a black woman, so when she is dismissed, she assumes that is the reason.


Truthfully, there’s still a lot we don’t know about June. There is even more we don’t know about Singh.


What seemed like a clear-cut case now seems more nuanced. Hopefully, the dynamic between her and Singh is one they will continue to explore.

Dr: Bishop: We’re still waiting on an ETA from the scene. In the meantime, I want –
Claire: What’s he doing?
Dr. Bishop: Dr. Hamed! Running into the fire, apparently.


We also want them to explore Claire more because she is awesome!


Up until this point, most of what we knew about Claire was how she related to Dr. Bishop. She was the angel on his shoulder, and the one he wanted between his sheets.


On Transplant Season 1 Episode 9, we saw her work with Bash. We knew she was a good doctor, because would she really be on this show if she wasn’t? We still didn’t know much about her.


Now we know. We learned that she ran away from home when she was15. Who else wants that backstory? Hands?


We learned that she goes out of her way to help people that don’t need medical attention and people who fall through the cracks.

Claire: I am so sorry to tell you, but the doctors weren’t able to save Chris’s life. He died from the overdose.
Alexia: I tried to help him. I did.
Claire: I spoke with the paramedics and they said the exact same thing. You did everything you could. Is there anyone I can call to be here with you.
Alexia: No, there’s uh, there’s no one.
Claire: I know how hard this must be.
Alexia: Do you? Really? Because the only person who ever gave a crap about me is dead.


As Dr. Bishop pointed out, she is the unsung hero of the hospital. Who knows how many people like Alexia she helps every day. Poor Alexia. During an emergency, it is easy to forget the people who were already seeking medical help.


Theo didn’t show us anything new, but it’s always nice to see him. Bombing his interview was a shame, but we knew it wouldn’t last. They’re keeping him around.


With Theo staying, Amira and Bash will be staying put. And given what might happen in his marriage soon, he could probably use the company.


Theo is staying, and Mags is back; the status quo has been maintained. Yea! But how long can it stay that way with Dr. Bishop’s questionable health and Bash’s PTSD?

That was a tough day. I know you’re all exhausted. We weren’t perfect, but we came through. What we do here is about more than being perfect. It’s about showing up no matter how we’re tested and leaving everything on the floor. That’s what we do every day, and nothing makes me more proud than knowing that. Now get back to work.

Dr. Bishop


What do you think, Fanatics? Should Bash get help? Is Singh prejudiced? Should Mags’ story have been drawn out? Do you want more Claire?


Let us know in the comments, and remember, you can watch Transplant online right here via TV Fanatic.

Leora W is a staff writer for TV Fanatic..



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