CNN Cheers New Woke Superman Ditching Pro-American ‘Ethno-Nationalism’

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On Tuesday’s New Day, co-host John Berman cheered the woke rebranding of DC’s Superman, along with Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter.

The two discussed the significance of DC superheroes such as Superman and Batman, acknowledging their place in America’s history as significant cultural figures. “I think they also represent something different in American history, and, and you know, Superman, very much a messiah figure. Batman represents the true vigilante,” said Berman. 

 

 

The conversation then turned to the new Superman, the son of original Superman Clark Kent. Jon Kent is bisexual and reportedly cares about the climate crisis and refugees. The Superman motto, “Truth, justice, and the American way,” has also received a rewrite: “Truth, justice, and a better tomorrow.”

“That’s days of programming on Fox News,” mocked Berman. Stelter attempted to justify the erasure of Superman’s traditional patriotism:

The American way part of the phrase came during World War II. That was a logical move when, you know, there was this World War. I think now the message is, this is a global franchise, this is a franchise looking to the future. And that kind of ethno-nationalism, you know, perhaps is not the right style going forward. I do think it is partly about appealing to a global box office. But hey, who can argue for, against a better tomorrow? What’s so bad about a better tomorrow? Sounds kinda vague and simple to me.

According to Stelter, “the American way” as an ideal is ethno-nationalistic – defining America in terms of ethnicity. Even American values are racist. Of course he would prefer something “vague and simple” for the woke reimagining of a superhero “messiah figure.” 

Berman and Stelter then continued to demean those who dislike this change. “Are you against a better tomorrow?…Tonight at 9:00 P.M,” Berman joked. 

The message is clear: the leftist hosts on CNN couldn’t be happier about the liberal takeover of culture, even at the expense of the values of one of America’s most treasured heroes.

This segment was sponsored by Samsung and Charmin.

You can read the full October 19 segment transcript below by clicking Expand:

JOHN BERMAN: Alright, I want to ask you about Batman, because why not?

BRIAN STELTER: Yes, please. 

BERMAN: It’s The Batman in this case, and the trailer is out for the new Batman movie. 

STELTER: We need a hero. 

BERMAN: Yes. 

TRAILER: Fear is a tool. When that light hits the sky, it’s not just a call. 

BERMAN: All right. People go nuts over Batman trailers. 

STELTER: Oh, yes, yes. This is, this is a big deal. CNN’s parent company, Warner Brothers, reintroducing Batman. You know, it’s been a decade since there’s been a Batman film. It’s been way too long. Warner Brothers, Warner Media under tremendous pressure to reboot this franchise, to bring it back in a big way. And, and, I think there’s been a really positive overall reaction, but you’re the big fan. You tell us. 

BERMAN: Well, we had to endure Ben Affleck, and I say that lovingly, as, you know, my, my fellow Masshole. But, but, we needed a new Batman, and hopefully this is it. Batman and Superman, and I say this as a Marvel fan, Batman and Superman are DC heroes, they’re different, because they’re decades older. And I think they also represent something different in American history, and, and you know, Superman very much a messiah figure. Batman represents the true vigilante. So people get more worked up about them than I think other superheroes. And Superman, they’re all worked up about. First of all, the new Superman, bisexual, now changing the motto from truth, justice, and the American way, to truth, justice, and a better tomorrow. 

STELTER: Yes. 

BERMAN: That’s days of programming on Fox News. 

STELTER: A better tomorrow, yes. Now, the American way part of the phrase came during World War II. That was a logical move when, you know, there was this World War. I think now the message is, this is a global franchise, this is a franchise looking to the future. And that kind of ethno-nationalism, you know, perhaps is not the right style going forward. I do think it is partly about appealing to a global box office. But hey, who can argue for, against a better tomorrow? What’s so bad about a better tomorrow? Sounds kinda vague and simple to me. 

BERMAN: Are you against a better tomorrow? 

STELTER: Are you against a better tomorrow?

BERMAN: Are there any of these that are against a better tomorrow? Tonight at 9:00 P.M. Brian Stelter, thank you very much for that. 

STELTER: Thanks.



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