To Shield Biden From Supply-Chain Blame, Media Say Stop Shopping

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As the holiday season draws nearer, corporate media outlets are demanding that Americans stop shopping in an effort to absolve President Joe Biden and his administration of blame for the supply chain crisis plaguing the country.

The Atlantic published a story this week claiming that the nation’s “supply-chain problems could be solved more quickly if affluent Americans would stop buying things they don’t need and often don’t really want.”

Instead of questioning why the Biden administration is delaying answers to key questions about the backup of cargo ships, author Amanda Mull says the burden to fix the crisis should rest on consumers, particularly wealthy ones, to stop consuming things in an economy still reeling from government-mandated shutdowns.

“You can take a bit of pressure, however tiny, off a system so overburdened that it threatens to grind everyone in it to dust. American shopping is a runaway train, gliding smooth and frictionless down the tracks toward God knows what over the horizon. Your brakes are small, but you can throw them whenever you want,” Mull wrote.

Vox similarly begged “affluent consumers” to abandon their Christmas gift orders and “thoughtless buying” to prioritize saving the environment. The outlet also defended the Biden administration’s small attention to a large and widespread panic as “heartening for consumers.”

“Experts predict that these problems, set off by the pandemic, won’t let up until 2022 or 2023. To help reduce supply chain backlogs, the Biden administration has ordered major ports and shipping companies, including Walmart, UPS, and FedEx, to increase their working hours,” Vox wrote.

Instead of blaming the Biden administration for exacerbating the supply and demand problems that began with the pandemic and are now fueled by the president’s inclination toward regulation and handing out federal money, corporate media gave the White House a pass to mock Americans’ inability to obtain the goods they need.

Last week, the president trivialized the rising cost of a cup of coffee (which is close to $3.77 a cup on average) in a tweet redirecting the focus on his affinity for “taxing the rich.”

“Here’s the deal: If you spent $3 on your coffee this morning, that’s more than what 55 major corporations paid in taxes in recent years,” Biden wrote. “It’s wrong — and it’s got to change.”

Shortly before that, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki joked that the supply chain issues facing a majority of American families are simply “the tragedy of the treadmill that’s delayed.”

White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain also downplayed the crisis in a retweet mischaracterizing the historic inflation and backup of goods as “high class problems.”

Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg avoided talking about the crisis altogether while he took a cushy two months of leave to be at home.

Americans are growing increasingly worried about their access to key goods and ability to purchase them. Even those who are awaiting Christmas presents, which Psaki said are not guaranteed to be delivered on time, are getting mocked for wanting to celebrate the holidays after Biden and his team urged people to stay isolated at home last year.

The Biden administration already showed the United States that dealing with this supply crisis is not as important to them as pushing vaccine mandates or trying to pass expensive legislation filled with leftist agenda items, and now the corporate media are explicitly blaming consumers for buying things even though restoring the delicate economy requires it.

The media will never admit that this crisis is Biden’s fault, but they will gladly throw Americans who just want to live their lives under the bus to save what’s left of the administration’s reputation.

Jordan Davidson is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.





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