HUH? Joy Reid Insists High Turnout Means Voter Suppression Is…Real?

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Over the past year, the liberal media have invested so much time and effort in selling the lie that Georgia’s election law is racist and suppresses votes that they are actively beginning to warp reality to fit with their flawed vision. For hapless MSNBC hack Joy Reid on Monday night, this took the form of some truly impressive lies, logical inconsistency, and outright racism as she tried to claim that record-high early voting ahead of Tuesday’s Peach State primaries didn’t change the fact that those who oppose Democratic gubernatorial nominee (and future President of United Earth) Stacey Abrams are white and racists salivating at the chance to block minorities from voting.

After having started by calling Georgia’s election “Jim Crow version 2.0,” Reid moved from strength to strength, arguing that, “Republicans, with the help of some in the political press, are now using the huge turnout in the primary so far to push a new Big Lie that the record turnout, which is mainly from Republican primary voters, means that Georgia’s suppressive voting law is not suppressive at all, despite the fact that the voters that it was meant to harm most, are not voting in contested primaries.” 

 

 

Reid introduced Abrams and then decided to double down on her claim that the media are biased toward Republicans:

I feel like a narrative is sort of congealing among much of the political press, that comes from Republicans, but it is settling in even amongst some folks in my profession, that because lots of people turned out…there is no voter suppression in Georgia. But I note, as I did in the intro that it’s largely, you know, substantially more Republicans.

One has to wonder if Reid has even looked at the races in Georgia. The most high-profile race is the Republican gubernatorial primary, between Pence-endorsed incumbent Mike Kemp and Trump-endorsed David Perdue, while Abrams is running unopposed. And Reid is crying “voter suppression” because of increased GOP voter turnout? Occam’s Razor is clearly not a part of Joy Reid’s cognitive toolset. 

Reid then undercut her entire argument by admitting, “Maybe the real test for how the law affects them will come in November.”

Undeterred by her own tonal whiplash, Reid pitched a softball question about voter suppression which she primed by telling Abrams, “They are not the ones who have long lines.” If there is one sign of a suppressed electorate, it’s long lines of voters waiting to vote for which candidate they want to be elected. But as for Republican voters, “They get to breeze right through. They are not the ones who have suppression.”

Apparently, Reid thinks the Georgia law creates a special VIP line for Republican voters. 
                                    
Abrams agreed with Reid’s rambling, employing her new favorite simile of throwing people in shark-infested waters. 

After giving Abrams an opportunity to explain her comment about how Georgia was “the worst state in the country to live” (which Abrams admitted was “inartfully delivered”), Reid decided to conclude her interview with a dash of casual racism:

It feels like a lot of the Republican rhetoric, not just here, in a lot of states, is speaking to one Georgia. Kemp and Perdue, there’s one Georgia they’re speaking to, and it doesn’t look like us and it — it feels exclusionary, that, like, we’re happy with what we have. Nobody who is — who doesn’t have money, no one who isn’t wealthy, no one who isn’t white is part of their Georgia.

One can only hope Georgian voters will see this for the vile race-baiting divisive rhetoric that it is.

Joy Reid’s latest racism was sponsored by Discover and Simplisafe. Their contact information is linked.

Click “Expand” to see the relevant transcript.

MSNBC’s The ReidOut
5/23/22
7:02:32 PM ET

JOY REID: The former President’s Big Lie in Georgia has also led Georgia to become ground zero for voter suppression, with its Jim Crow version 2.0 voting law put in place last year by Republicans using a baseless assertion of fraud. And Republicans, with the help of some in the political press, are now using the huge turnout in the primary so far to push a new Big Lie that the record turnout, which is mainly from Republican primary voters, means that Georgia’s suppressive voting law is not suppressive at all, despite the fact that the voters that it was meant to harm most, are not voting in contested primaries. Maybe the real test for how the law affects them will come in November. Joining me now is Stacey Abrams, Democratic candidate for Georgia governor. And, Leader Abrams, thanks so much for being here. I have to start with that, because I feel like a narrative is sort of congealing among much of the political press, that comes from Republicans, but it is settling in even amongst some folks in my profession, that because lots of people turned out, 857,000 so far and counting, that means that there is no voter suppression in Georgia. But I note, as I did in the intro that it’s largely, you know, substantially more Republicans. They are not the ones who have long lines. They get to breeze right through. They are not the ones who have suppression. And this is in-person voting. This isn’t mail-in. What — what do you take, what do you make of this new narrative?

STACEY ABRAMS: Well, I think the most important piece is to winnow it down to this. The equivalent of saying that more people voting means there is no suppression is like telling people that if you get in the water, there are no sharks. If more people get in the water, there are fewer sharks. There’s no correlation there. Voter suppression is about blocking or impeding certain types of voters from participating in elections, and as you pointed out, right now Republicans have the most competitive elections, but what we also don’t know is what is the mail-in ballot rejection rate? 

REID: Right.

ABRAMS: What are the difficulties people are having? But we do have some very real examples of what this law precipitated. 

(….)
    
7:05:12 p.m.
2 minutes and 7 seconds

ABRAMS: But, that said, we do know that we are seeing outrage driving voters of color to the polls and that’s the other thing that we used to say, and I said constantly. The antidote to voter suppression is voter turnout.

REID: Yeah.

ABRAMS: They’re going to try to make it hard, so the more of us who show up, we overwhelm the system with our presence, but to let them off the hook —

REID: Yeah.

ABRAMS — for what they have done, simply because they didn’t do it as well as they thought —

REID: Yeah.

ABRAMS: — is, I think, nonsensical.

REID: Well, and also because the law they put in helped some — more of their voters turn out…

ABRAMS: Absolutely.

REID: — well, that doesn’t say there’s no voter suppression against the other voters. It says it helped their voters. Anyway, let’s move on. You are taking a lot of heat from everybody. I mean, I have been — when I get to the states, I always watch local TV —

ABRAMS: Yes.

REID: — because I just want to see what’s on local TV. Well, it’s all political ads, of course. And it was amazing to me that all the political ads featured you, even if somebody was running for dogcatcher. They’re like, but that Stacey Abrams, I’m going to fight her from this dogcatching spot. You have also been getting a lot of heat from particularly Brian Kemp, but others, about something that you said and so let me just play it. This was something that you said at a Gwinnett County Democratic gala. Here it is.

ABRAMS [on 05/21/22]: I am tired of hearing about being the best state in the country to do business, when we are the worst state in the country to live. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Now, somebody’s going to try to PolitiFact me on this, so let me contextualize. When you’re number 48 for mental health, when you’re number one for maternal mortality, when you have an incarceration rate that’s on the rise and wages that are on the decline, then you are not the number one place to live.

REID: I mean, find the lie. I mean, where’s the lie? Why do you suppose that has caused so much contretemps?

ABRAMS: I think it was inartfully delivered. My point was a point that I have made many times and my passion in making this point is important, because we are listening to Brian Kemp give a — give narrative about a record that does not reflect reality. The more I go around the state, the more I talk to people who are deeply in pain.

(….)

7:07:47 p.m.
31 seconds

ABRAMS: And so my point is well-intended, which is that, for so many Georgians, this is not the number one place to be, but we have the capacity for greatness and if people didn’t splice the pieces they like and actually listen to my entire narrative, my point is that I want more for Georgia. I believe in our greatness. I moved here the first time because my parents brought me. I came back the second time because this is where I want to live and I think there’s a phrase in the black church that I love. It’s like, charge it to my head, and not my heart. My heart is in Georgia.

(….)

7:12:26 p.m.
35 seconds

REID: You know the thing about — I do love Atlanta. It’s a great city. But you — it feels like a lot of the Republican rhetoric, not just here, in a lot of states, is speaking to one Georgia. Kemp and Perdue, there’s one Georgia they’re speaking to, and it doesn’t look like us and it — it feels exclusionary, that, like, we’re happy with what we have. Nobody who is — who doesn’t have money, no one who isn’t wealthy, no one who isn’t white is part of their Georgia. It just — to me, as a person that’s just visiting here, that’s what sort of troubles me.

ABRAMS: Well, I think the challenge is even broader. They don’t care about rural Georgians, regardless of color.

REID: Yeah.



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