Maxine Waters Calls for More Aggressive Confrontations in the Street If Chauvin Is Not Found Guilty of Murder – RedState

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On Saturday night California Congresswoman Mad-Maxine Waters joined demonstrators in the streets of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, who were protesting the shooting last week of Daunte Wright by former Brooklyn Center Police Officer Kim Potter.

Potter fired one shot at Wright with her handgun which she mistakenly pulled instead of her taser.  Potter was arrested and charged with manslaughter on Thursday, and I wrote about it here.

Waters was captured on video discussing what the reaction of the public should be next week in the event the jury in the Derek Chauvin murder trial returns anything other than a guilty verdict on the charge of murder that has been made against him.  Here is what she had to say on the subject:

While my friend Jack Posobiec states in his Tweet that Waters was discussing what should happen in the event of an acquittal, during the course of the comments Waters made it clear that a conviction only on the charge of manslaughter should get the same response as an acquittal.  In fact, in an express and profound confession of her own ignorance, Waters said that in her view Chauvin was guilty of First Degree Murder, even though he is charged with only Second Degree Murder.

The First Degree Murder statute in Minnesota covers the following intentional acts of killing another person:

(a) Whoever does any of the following is guilty of murder in the first degree and shall be sentenced to imprisonment for life:

(1) causes the death of a human being with premeditation and with intent to effect the death of the person or of another;

(2) causes the death of a human being while committing or attempting to commit criminal sexual conduct…;

(3) causes the death of a human being with intent to effect the death of the person or another, while committing or attempting to commit burglary, aggravated robbery, kidnapping, arson, a drive-by shooting, tampering with a witness, escape from custody, or any felony involving the unlawful sale of a controlled substance;

(4) causes the death of a peace officer, prosecuting attorney, judge, or a guard employed at a Minnesota state or local correctional facility, with intent to effect the death of that person while the person is engaged in the performance of official duties;

(5) causes the death of a minor while committing child abuse…;

(6) causes the death of a human being while committing domestic abuse…;

(7) causes the death of a human being while committing, conspiring to commit, or attempting to commit a felony crime to further terrorism and the death occurs under circumstances manifesting an extreme indifference to human life.

The Minnesota Legislature has limited First Degree Murder to killings involving premeditation, criminal sex offense, a dangerous felony, a peace officer of judge engaged in the performance of their duties, while committing child abuse, while committing domestic abuse, and in the commission of an act of terrorism.

I could set forth here a series of a half-dozen or so pejorative terms to describe the less-than-exemplary life lived by George Floyd prior to his unfortunate death while in police custody, but what would be the point?  The law is meaningless to her, and it always has been.  Her seat in Congress has been little more than a grift for the entirety of her time there. She’s used her campaign and staff payroll to enrich her children and barely makes any effort at all to hide it.  Her race-baiting for three decades has kept her safe in office so the grift can continue.

But it should not be overlooked that Waters made it clear by her comments that anything other than a conviction of Chauvin for murder is not acceptable.

“We’ve got to stay in the streets.”

“We’ve got to not only stay in the streets, but we’ve got to fight for justice.”

“I hope that we’ll get a verdict that will say guilty, guilty, guilty.”

“Oh no, not manslaugher, this is guilty for murder … as far as I’m concerned it is first degree.”

“We’ve got to get more confrontational.  They’ve got to know that we mean business.”

The jury in the Chauvin trial was not sequestered by Judge Cahill. They are all at home every night with all media available to them even though they have been instructed by Judge Cahill that they should not be viewing any media about the trial.  But one juror lives in Brooklyn Center, and two others live in neighboring communities.

Waters is not prepared to accept any verdict other than a guilty verdict on the murder count even though the trial was kept in Hennepin County because it is the most racially diverse county in Minnesota, and local activists demanded that the jury be held in a place where the likelihood of having black jurors was the greatest.

Hennepin County voted between 62% and 65% for each Democrat candidate for President between 2008 and 2016, and then voted 70% for Joe Biden — allegedly.

But Waters claims any verdict by the jury other than guilty — after three weeks of trial evidence where the State of Minnesota was able to put before the Jury everything it had on Derek Chauvin — is a reason to stay in the streets and get “more confrontational”.

Maybe she should watch some of the videos from the week after George Floyd’s death last May.

What would “more confrontational” look like if that was your starting point?

Maxine Waters is and always has been a danger to the community and a pox on Congress.

The law is meaningless to Maxine Waters, which is an extraordinary comment to make about a 16 term member of the House of Representatives.  The best I can offer about Waters is that she’s  82 and the actuarial tables are in our favor.

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