WATCH: Mo Brooks Security Footage Released — It Doesn’t Support His Claims

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Mo Brooks claims that security footage proves a process server illegally snuck into his home to “accost” his wife and serve her with the lawsuit he’s been dodging for months. Now he’s released the footage — and it doesn’t actually show what he claimed.

[Screenshot via Mo Brooks/Twitter]

“HORRIBLE Swalwell’s team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife!” Brooks tweeted, declaring it a case of criminal trespass worthy of prison time and fines. He promised to release security footage proving this.

Later, he tweeted the video below, which he describes as “showing the man chasing my wife into my home.” (It doesn’t.)

Instead, the process server pulls in behind Brooks’ wife, and darts up to her garage as she pulls in. It’s not clear on video how far into the building, if at all, he goes, although Martha Brooks describes him as standing two feet from her when she exited the car. She can then be seen pursuing him as he exits and gets in his vehicle to leave, job done. Brooks goes behind his vehicle, apparently to get his plate number, and when she is out of the way, he leaves.

According to AL, Brooks says that she “screamed repeatedly at the man to leave the garage,” and that he “finally” just left the documents, which she refused to take, on the floor, and left. However, the video shows that the server was not out of sight of the camera for more than 16 seconds, which doesn’t really support a narrative of him refusing to leave.

Police confirmed that Brooks reported the incident as a trespassing violation, but have not disclosed whether there will be charges.

Brooks has been carrying out a campaign of mockery against Swalwell and his team over their inability to serve him with the lawsuit, including tweeting a ‘wanted’ poster of himself.

The lawsuit, in which Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani are co-defendants, alleges that the defendants incited the violence at the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6th. Swalwell was forced to request an extension on the 90-day time period in order to serve Brooks, because he had evaded process servers throughout that time.

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